First comprehensive list of non-native species established in three major regions of the United States

Part of a figure from Simpson and Eyler (2018) portraying numbers of non-native taxa in regions of Alaska.

The report was published on November 6 and includes records of non-native terrestrial invertebrates in Alaska.

Report:
Simpson, A. & Eyler, M. C. 2018. First comprehensive list of non-native species established in three major regions of the United States. Open-File Report 2018-1156. U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Geological Survey.  https://doi.org/10.3133/ofr20181156

Data:
Simpson, A.; Eyler, M. C.; Cannister, M.; Libby, R.; Kozlowski, N.; Sellers, E. & Guala, G. F. 2018. Dataset of the first comprehensive list of non-native species established in three major regions of the United States: U.S. Geological Survey data release. U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Geological Survey. https://doi.org/10.5066/P9E5K160

The News Tribune: This isn’t a furry building — it’s hundreds of daddy longlegs, Alaska park rangers say

Rangers at Alaska’s Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve posted a Halloween picture showing hundreds of daddy long legs hanging off a building, making it look like it was furry. Rangers said the clustering is for hunting or protection. Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve

The article appeared on October 31.

https://www.thenewstribune.com/news/nation-world/national/article220923140.html

2019 Annual meeting

Our 12th annual Alaska Entomological Society meeting will be held in Fairbanks at the Department of Natural Resources building on Saturday, February 9, 2019.

If you’d like to give a talk, please email president@akentsoc.org with a presentation title, author, job affiliation, and approximate length of the presentation (suggested length of either 15 or 25 min + 5 min for questions), and/or agenda items for the business meeting.

Our meeting minutes are posted from last year here.

Alaska Interagency News Release: Spruce beetle activity continues to rise in Southcentral Alaska

This news release was posted on October 1.

Aerial surveys conducted this summer by state and federal forest health specialists documented nearly 558,000 acres of active spruce beetle-caused tree mortality in Southcentral Alaska. The surveys are part of an annual program to detect forest insect and disease occurrences in Alaska forests. With the addition of this year’s data, the cumulative area impacted by spruce beetle in the region is estimated to have grown to roughly 910,000 acres since the current spruce beetle outbreak began in 2016.

http://dnr.alaska.gov/commis/pic/releases/10-1-18%20Spruce%20beetle%20activity%20continues%20to%20rise%20in%20Southcentral%20Alaska.pdf

Leaf herbivory by insects during summer reduces overwinter browsing by moose

Effect of insecticide treatment during the growing season on subsequent stem production by, and overwinter browsing on, sandbar willow. From Allman, et al. (2018).

The article appeared in BMC Ecology on September 27 and showed interactoins among the willow leaf blotch miner, , sandbar willow, and moose.

https://doi.org/10.1186/s12898-018-0192-x