Alaska Interagency News Release: Spruce beetle activity continues to rise in Southcentral Alaska

This news release was posted on October 1.

Aerial surveys conducted this summer by state and federal forest health specialists documented nearly 558,000 acres of active spruce beetle-caused tree mortality in Southcentral Alaska. The surveys are part of an annual program to detect forest insect and disease occurrences in Alaska forests. With the addition of this year’s data, the cumulative area impacted by spruce beetle in the region is estimated to have grown to roughly 910,000 acres since the current spruce beetle outbreak began in 2016.

http://dnr.alaska.gov/commis/pic/releases/10-1-18%20Spruce%20beetle%20activity%20continues%20to%20rise%20in%20Southcentral%20Alaska.pdf

Leaf herbivory by insects during summer reduces overwinter browsing by moose

Effect of insecticide treatment during the growing season on subsequent stem production by, and overwinter browsing on, sandbar willow. From Allman, et al. (2018).

The article appeared in BMC Ecology on September 27 and showed interactoins among the willow leaf blotch miner, , sandbar willow, and moose.

https://doi.org/10.1186/s12898-018-0192-x

Infestation with the nasopulmonary mite Halarachne halichoeri in threatened southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis)

Scanning electron microscopy of adult Halarachne halichoeri from Pesapane et al. (2018).

This article appeared in International Journal for Parasitology: Parasites and Wildlife on September 29 and pertains to Alaskan populations of Halarachne halichoeri, sea otters, seals, and even humans.

https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijppaw.2018.09.009

Webinar: Climate Change in Alaska: Impacts on the Entomofauna

Tuesday, October 2, 2018 at 10:00 AM AKDT
Speaking: Derek Sikes, University of Alaska Museum

The University of Alaska Museum Insect Collection is a biorepository for vouchers from varied projects throughout the state. A number of examples of possible and potential climate change impacts on the terrestrial invertebrates of Alaska will be presented. These will cover various taxa including snow-field associated rove beetles, butterflies, ants, and earthworms. This work will be put in a global context.

Available online or in-person in 407 IARC/Akasofu building on the UAF campus.  More information and registration is available at https://accap.uaf.edu/insects.